Friday, February 22, 2019

5 Essential Practices for Designated and Integrated ELD

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Elizabeth Iwaszewicz talks about five strategies for designated and integrated English Language Development (ELD).

 

Today’s Sponsor: Metaverse is a powerful augmented reality app. They have a new classroom management tool called Collections. These let the teacher:

  • View all student experiences in one place
  • Edit and View Experiences in one place
  • Share Student Experiences as a group

Metaverse is free for teachers and students to create as many AR experiences as you want. The new classroom management features in Metaverse are free to try with promo code ARforEDU. You can use these features after your free trial for a $7 a month fee. My students are making apps in Metaverse. Try it out today!

Listen to Elizabeth Iwaszewicz on the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

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Elizabeth Iwaszewicz’s Bio as Submitted

Elizabeth IwaszewiczTwenty years in the elementary school setting

Current Position: Lead Coach, Curriculum and Instruction, Office of Professional Growth and Development
San Francisco Unified School District, San Francisco, CA

  • National Board Certified Teacher Generalist, Early Childhood
  • Instructional Leadership Corps
  • Collaborate with a team of educators statewide in partnership with Stanford University and Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE) to provide professional development to public school educators in implementing CCSS and NGSS.
  • Teaching Channel Presenter: Five Essential Practices in the Elementary ELL Classroom
  • Presenter at the Good Teaching Conference (2016, 2019)- Using HyperLinks in Classroom Curriculum, Design Thinking with MakeyMakeys
  • Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Video with San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) Multilingual Department
  • Presenter at SFUSD events on Supporting ELLs with Academic Conversation
Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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The post 5 Essential Practices for Designated and Integrated ELD appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog https://www.coolcatteacher.com/5-essential-practices-for-designated-and-integrated-eld/

Thursday, February 21, 2019

How to Teach AI in the Classroom

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Michelle Zimmerman, author of Teaching AI: Exploring New Frontiers for Learning, talks about Artificial Intelligence and what we should be teaching kids in our classrooms today.

Today’s Sponsor: Metaverse is a powerful augmented reality app. They have a new classroom management tool called Collections. These let the teacher:

  • View all student experiences in one place
  • Edit and View Experiences in one place
  • Share Student Experiences as a group

Metaverse is free for teachers and students to create as many AR experiences as you want. The new classroom management features in Metaverse are free to try with promo code ARforEDU. You can use these features after your free trial for a $7 a month fee. My students are making apps in Metaverse. Try it out today!

Listen to Michelle Zimmerman on the 10-Minute Teacher Podcast

//html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/8729165/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/yes/direction/backward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/2d568f/

Michelle Zimmerman’s Bio as Submitted

Michelle Zimmerman, author of “Teaching AI:Teaching AI: Exploring New Frontiers for Learning” received her Ph.D. in Learning Sciences and Human Development from the University of Washington.

As a Microsoft Innovative Educator Expert, she is a third year Microsoft MVP for global impact. With 18 years in the classroom (PreK-10th), her students gained international recognition through global school visits hosting Ministries of Education and Delegates at Renton Prep from over 16 countries including China, Pakistan, Serbia, UK, Japan, and South Africa. She co-designed Renton Prep and is part of the leadership team.

Renton Prep has won multiple awards including FETC STEM Excellence. She and her students have presented at educational technology conferences nationally and internationally, such as Macmillan and Scientific American STEM Summit at New York Academy of Medicine and New York Academy of Sciences, SXSWEdu, ISTE, FETC, NCCE, TCEA, iNACOL, American Education Research Association, CARNET in Croatia and BETT in London. She is published in Springer’s International Human-Computer Interaction Series and press such as VentureBeat and Vecernji list in Croatia.

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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The post How to Teach AI in the Classroom appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog https://www.coolcatteacher.com/how-to-teach-ai-in-the-classroom/

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

How to Use Metaverse: Awesome Augmented Reality and New Features

From the Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis

Follow @coolcatteacher on Twitter

Metaverse is a powerful augmented reality (AR) programming app for classrooms. I first wrote about this app in December 2017 shortly after launch. Metaverse has come a long way and is specifically focused on becoming an amazing AR app for classrooms with the new Collections feature. In this blog post, I’ll share the vocabulary I use for teaching programming, how I teach with Metaverse, and some new features that help us manage our classroom as students program in AR and share with each other.

This blog post is sponsored by Metaverse. All opinions are my own.

Metaverse App GIF

What Is Metaverse?

Metaverse is a free augmented reality app where teachers and students can create unlimited experiences. Using Metaverse, my students have created fun quiz games, trivia experiences, and even an AR tour of our school.  I use Metaverse even before I start teaching programming with Scratch. This is because Metaverse is simple and easy to use.

Sign up for Metaverse now

Getting Started in Metaverse:

A student can go into Metaverse and make an experience in just a few minutes. Then, in the top right-hand corner, they can click to “share” their experience. They’ll see that first screen Immediately on their phone or tablet. Granted, it isn’t really a program yet, as the experience isn’t doing anything, but just realizing that they’ve put a character into the experience gets students excited. The instant feedback, ability to create multiple paths (or branches), embed videos, 3D characters, websites, and even 360 experiences make this tool immediately interactive and usable for students.

As you can see in the graphic below, each screen has possible “scenes” that you can add. They’ve already loaded objects that you can add to scenes, including pop culture and common objects needed in educational topics.

A Few Programming and Design Concepts That I Teach With Metaverse

Remember that Metaverse requires NO coding at all. It is simply an object-oriented drag-and-drop tool. No coding required.

That said, I want my students to end up coding. Metaverse engages them within minutes, allowing me to start teaching them some basic programming concepts. I’ve bolded the vocabulary for those of you who are teaching programming or basic coding. These terms, I believe, should be introduced through a simple-to-use tool like Metaverse. That way, when my students are ready for full app making, they understand the concepts and terminology that they’ll need on a larger scale.

For example, I start with a simple, one-day, “make something fun” experience in Metaverse. However, for the second project, I encourage students to make a major step up toward creating something to perform like an app that a user can interact with. With this in mind, I want my students to be familiar with terminology, and here are some examples.

UX, Alpha Testing, Beta Testing

UX stands for “user experience.” When student teams are alpha testing the app, I have them watch each other and notice how another person uses the app, which can help them make changes. (We also learn beta testing, which is what happens when a person NOT on their team tests the app.)

Onboarding and Cascading Information Theory

I also teach the concept of onboarding, which means what happens as you bring a new user into an app. Just like when entering a video game for the first time, a user doesn’t always need all of the information at once. This is called cascading information theory, which says that information should be given in “the minimum possible snippets for understanding each point during a game narrative.”

Friction, Error Prevention, and UX

Secondly, I want students to consider how users will end their experience. For example, when designing an app or game, error prevention is a basic part of making it usable. In website design, friction isn’t really a good thing — it’s an element of operation that impedes or prevents a user from doing what they want to do. However, when someone is using an app and is about to exit or do something irreversible, adding friction to the user interface design helps prevent errors. For example, Microsoft is using friction when MS Word asks if you really want to exit the program without saving changes. The purpose is to keep you from making an error and not saving your work.

Here’s an example of friction in Metaverse. If a button or screen isn’t linked to another, the user will see a red exclamation point and the experience will end. If an experience ends, then the user might have to start over at the beginning, something that most people don’t want to happen. Additionally, if the user doesn’t expect the experience to end, they’ll believe the app has “crashed” even if it was an intentional ending. I find that the ending of an experience is an ideal place to talk about UX, friction, and error prevention. So one of the first things I have students design is an ending screen that will ask users if they really want to leave the experience or go back to a certain point in the app. Then, if students are building out a large experience, instead of the red exclamation points, they can send users to the “error prevention” screen to keep them from leaving the app unintentionally.

UI, UI Design, and Consistency

UI stands for “User Interface.” Thus, UI design is designing the user interface. One essential element of UI design is consistency. The user wants certain elements look and behave in the same way. For example, I remind students about the “case” of words in this case. Typically “title case” is the best for buttons and titles, but sometimes when a character is talking they might want to go to “sentence case.” These types of decisions have to be made at the beginning as they are discussing UI.

Ideation and Planning

The top student mistake in a larger build is starting without first ideating, or generating ideas, for their app or experience. Then, after they ideate, they have to plan what will be in the experience. I like to use Kanban Boards and Agile Software Development principles (something outside the scope of this article). Without project management tools, students will waste time and not complete the task.

There are many more terminologies that I teach with Metaverse, but these are just some that we use at the beginning of the process. I’ve included them on the image below as a quick reference.

Metaverse- teaching terms - pinterest - FINAL

Collections: An Awesome Solution to Classroom Management in Metaverse

As I see it, Collections solves two basic problems of teaching in Metaverse. The first problem is that of linking the students in the class together to see one another’s apps for testing and feedback. In the past, students had to make screenshots of their code and print them to easily test one another’s experiences and share best practices for their apps. This problem has been eliminated with the new “Collections” feature.

The second challenge was that I sometimes wanted to help students on their app or dig into their setup to help troubleshoot a problem. This problem has also been solved because I can go directly into their code using the Collections feature.

While experience creation is free and unlimited for students and teachers, if you want to try Collections, sign up with the code #ARinEDU to try it free now. Go to https://studio.gometa.io/teachers to get started. If you like Collections, you can keep it for $7/month after the trial is over.

Metaverse remains an engaging and powerful augmented reality programming tool for your classroom. Compatible with devices of all kinds, students can also build on a variety of devices, and Collections gives you a teacher’s-eye view of everything happening in all of your student experiences. I hope you’ll try this one out!

Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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The post How to Use Metaverse: Awesome Augmented Reality and New Features appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!


from Cool Cat Teacher BlogCool Cat Teacher Blog https://www.coolcatteacher.com/how-to-use-metaverse-awesome-augmented-reality-and-new-features/

Movies and the upcoming Oscars

We have 11 activities for your Oscar week.

Do the better movies make the most money – Updated! – Do the the movies that are nominated for the Best Picture at the Academy Award make the most money?  At most ten movies are nominated each year.  Students compare the votes that the last 18 nominated movies received with their worldwide gross in theaters.  Does number of votes for best picture correlate with money earned at theaters?

Highest Grossing Movies – Let your students develop their own ideas about compounded percent change while they have the opportunity to speak about the upcoming Academy Awards show. Worldwide box office income is compared for the top ten grossing movies of all time. Is total gross the most appropriate way to judge the popularity of a movie?  How does inflation and increasing ticket prices come into play? Inflation rates are used to let students calculate how the money of 1997 compares to the money of 2013. Students see for themselves what exponential growth means.

Opening Weekend – Students compare the data from the “Opening Weekend” gross to the “Total Lifetime Gross (Domestic) of several popular movies.  The activity is accessible for any student who can plot points on a grid, so it could be used for students as young as 4th graders.  Older students can create a line of best fit and equation to model the data and make predictions.  By plotting and analyzing the data students decide if they can, in fact, predict the future.

AnimationPixar vs Dreamworks – Animated films are a billion dollar industry.  The two biggest producers of animated films are Dreamworks and Pixar.  The two have been going head to head for over ten years. So how do they stack up to each other?  Which company is making more money on their films?  According to critics, which company makes the better films?

Old stained admission ticketsMovie ticket costs over time – Updated! – Students check out the changes in movie ticket prices over the last 30 years. Using a scatter plot (or his data) students analyze rates of change, make predictions about the future ticket costs, guesses about past costs and try to create lines of best fit.

Money making holiday movies – Students analyze holiday movie data. They will round, estimate, compare, calculate percent increase, consider the most appropriate graphical representation and graph the data … along with sharing what they have seen and enjoyed.

GodzillagodzillaSF – Since 1954 when the first Godzilla movie was made, the creature has grown. Students compare Godzilla’s height with the height of recognizable buildings and judge whether his height is accurately portrayed.  Scatter plots, data analysis, sequel predictions.

Rapunzelrapunzel – Students learn a little bit about the original Grimm fairy tale and a little about the incredible animation in this Disney movie, Tangled. They calculate the weight of Rapunzel’s 70 feet of hair and do some converting from meters to feet. This activity lets students use rate and percents as they consider really long hair and a pretty good movie.

How many movies can you see in one day – With plenty of days off from school, plan to spend a day at the movie theater.  You want to see as many movies as possible. Robert Kaplinsky shared this lesson with us. Students are asked to analyze a situation, consider contributing factors, and present a logical solution.

Movies&SequelsWhich is better … original movies or their sequels? – From our gathered data students debate the question and consider what they can conclude from various graphs and what is an adequate sized random sampling is adequate.

Fantastic Beasts – How much does it cost to make a Harry Potter movie? – In this activity students use the average cost of making a Harry Potter movie to estimate the cost of creating the “Beasts” movie. The task is open, in that it asks students to analyze central tendency, using either median, mode or mean.  Which is the best predictor of the cost of making this new movie?

from Yummy Math https://www.yummymath.com/2019/movies-and-the-upcoming-oscars/